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Firing With Dignity - Making Job Termination As Amicable As Possible
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Firing With Dignity - Making Job Termination As Amicable As Possible

by Elizabeth Repchuck

Your goal as an employer is to make the separation as amicable as possible, allowing your employee to walk out the door with their dignity. Here are some basic, simple rules to ensure the same.

When couples divorce, there is often a scorned spouse who wants the other to pay for the humiliation and feeling of loss.

That shouldn't be the case in an employer-employee relationship.

By the time you as the employer decide to enforce a 'divorce', it should be no surprise to the employee because you have already taken a number of steps with the goal of either salvaging the relationship or bringing it to a close (an exception to this would be a just-cause firing based on theft or deliberate insubordination).

Your goal as an employer is to make the separation as amicable as possible, allowing your employee to walk out the door with their dignity intact.

Why should you care about that?

It's quite simple - a mishandled 'divorce' or firing creates anger and resentment. That leads to lawyers, and as a business owner/manager you want to avoid those waters wherever possible. That means you must keep the discussion away from the employee's failings- this isn't a coaching session, it's a termination.

Here are some steps that will help achieve what you want while letting the employee move on with his or her life.

  • Review your material prior to the meeting
  • Always have two people present, one taking the lead the other taking notes
  • Secure a private location
  • Best to hold meeting at the beginning of the shift or the end
  • Never terminate on Friday
  • Written termination letter should be prepared and ready for presentation with money owing
  • Meetings should be very short with minimal exchanges of information. You should give a general reason for the termination, but you do not have to go into detail and it is advisable that you do not go into detail
  • Ensure that you are consistent with your message
  • Ensure that you have gone over the employee checklist. For example, do you have IT standing by to turn off computer system,? Have you thought about how your you're your employee is going to clean out their office space?
  • Never hedge on the termination. Don't let tears or anger deter from your position... keep to the script.

Allow the employee options for their departure. For instance, they may want to leave directly and arrange to return later at a scheduled time to pick up their belongings. It is best to let the employee say goodbyes within reason - don't make them feel like a criminal by having them escorted off the premises.

If you handle the termination correctly, you and the employee can each move forward with minimal disruption.

Elizabeth Repchuck is president of Gain HR, a boutique human resources consulting firm that works with its clients to provide custom solutions that will motivate, encourage and empower staff to provide exceptional client-driven services. http://www.gainhr.ca

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5906163

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